1_104 18/1/39
MISS MARTHA FRANCES SMITH (Aunt Pat)

22 Place Vendome
18 Jan. 1839
She hopes they will not leave Paris yet as they are very much interested there; they haye tickets almost every day for the Chamber, and have heard Thiers and Guizot and Odilon Barrot who are three of the greatest speakers, also Moh; the noise and confusion there is very un-statesmanlikel; Thiers has twice disputed for the tribune with another orator who has barred the entrance and made him go down again; she describes the squabbles in the.Chamber, and the difficulty of keeping order; it is believed that this will be the last session and that the government will be defeated; they are seeing many French people, including Madame Desroyes, the daughter of General Hoche; gives an account of the widow of General Hoche; they have been several times to Madame Recamier's, and also to the salon of her niece, Madame Lenormand; Madame Lenormand is married to the lecturer and keeper of the Bibliotheque du Roi; he is a friend of their father and an habitue' of Miss Clarke; refers to the death of the Princess Marie; mentions several other people whom they have met in Paris society.
2p CLAYDON
Xerocopy: WELLCOME INST
1. The Nightingales' visit to Paris coincided with a period of great political turmoil. The government of Louis Philippe led by Louis Matthieu MoT (1781-1885) was under attack from an unlikely coalition of extreme Right wing and Left. The monarchist Frangois Guizot (1787-1874), an opponent of all social and electoral reform, led the Right; while the Left was composed of a variety of reformist and revolutionary opinions represented by Louis Adolphe Thiers (1796-1877) Odilon Barrot (1791-1870) and others. These men had no ground for a common internal policy, but were united in their dislike for the unadventurous and pacific foreign policy pursued by the King and Molk Two months of wrangling in the Chambre des D6put6s, during which Thiers spoke thirteen times and Guizot twelve, culminated in the dissolution of the Parlement on the 2nd February (see letter no.130 n. 1) and in the ensuing elections the verdict of the people of France went against the King and Molg.

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